Book Recommendation: THE VELVET HOURS

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“Old books contain a history that transcends the words inscribed within their pages. The paper, the ink, even the spacing of the words. They possess an ancient soul.” Alyson Richman, THE VELVET HOURS

Publisher Synopsis: 

From the international bestselling author of The Lost Wife and The Garden of Letters, comes a story—inspired by true events—of two women pursuing freedom and independence in Paris during WWII.

As Paris teeters on the edge of the German occupation, a young French woman closes the door to her late grandmother’s treasure-filled apartment, unsure if she’ll ever return. 

An elusive courtesan, Marthe de Florian cultivated a life of art and beauty, casting out all recollections of her impoverished childhood in the dark alleys of Montmartre. With Europe on the brink of war, she shares her story with her granddaughter Solange Beaugiron, using her prized possessions to reveal her innermost secrets. Most striking of all are a beautiful string of pearls and a magnificent portrait of Marthe painted by the Italian artist Giovanni Boldini. As Marthe’s tale unfolds, like velvet itself, stitched with its own shadow and light, it helps to guide Solange on her own path.

Inspired by the true account of an abandoned Parisian apartment, Alyson Richman brings to life Solange, the young woman forced to leave her fabled grandmother’s legacy behind to save all that she loved.

My Recommendation:

I know I can always count on Alyson Richman’s stories to have gorgeous prose, a compelling plot, and rich and fascinating subjects. Her latest novel, THE VELVET HOURS, both follows and elevates her pattern in what is her finest work to date.

Reading the pages of THE VELVET HOURS is like leafing through old letters or lifting old garments and artifacts from a trunk. Each piece holds such fascination, such history, it is worth lingering to gather their essence. Richman deftly makes a global narrative set in two wars into an intimate rendering of family and society. Her description of physical objects grounds the reader in the pages, and makes for a consuming sensory experience.

All of Richman’s characters are complicated and human. It is difficult to make a courtesan into a noble figure, but Richman does just that, and it is this courtesan–Marthe de Florian–who is the pulsing heart of the work. My only complaint is that the book ended. The story that follows the story is worthy of a novel, and I hope Richman picks up where she left off to give the reader more.

I feel as if I have been to the Parisian apartment-turned-time-capsule that inspired this novel, and I’d like to linger. If you enjoy beautifully written historical fiction, I highly recommend THE VELVET HOURS.

Have you read the book, or any of Richman’s previous novels? 

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